A Brother’s Campfire Adventure- August 10th, 2020

Hello Friends!

My day began by feeding the birds. They are on a show bird, high protein diet supplemented by greens from my garden that I am not using.

High Protein And Fresh Green Diet

I noticed they are not eating very much. In fact, they didn’t even care.

We hypothesized that they are eating cicadas and grasshoppers before I wake up and that my food is secondary. It saves on feed, so I am ok with it!

Well, on to my adventure.

It stopped several times before it started.

One of our tribe did not wish to get up and took a long time getting ready. While waiting, I noticed a tire on my car looked a little low so I took it in to get looked at.

Meanwhile, my Beloved had several packages to mail for her business and took them to the post office. By the time we completed these tasks we were still waiting.

And waiting.

Finally, the Garmin was set, the car was packed, and all members were tightly buckled in. We drove one quarter of a mile and we heard the telltale ka-ching sound of an online sale. It was a nice chunk of change and we have bills to pay so we headed back. The customer just can’t wait.

As soon as we got home, I got a text.

And perfect timing it may have been. I suppose God kept us from an accident or something.

Well, we were off. A seasoned man in our church gave me directions to a camping spot in an undisclosed location near Buena Vista, Colorado and it was time to scout it out.

The Undisclosed Location

Our first and last stop before arriving was Hartsel, Colorado. I refueled and left in a hurry.

After a while, we arrived, deep in the forest and set up camp at around 11,200 feet in the San Isabel National Forest.

Jones Mountain North I Believe

Due to the condition of the road and the ability of my vehicle, we had to walk our equipment in to our base camp. It was totally worth it.

After setting up camp. I was immediately met by what I call a camp robber jays. I am not sure what you call these little guys, but if you feed them they will spend all day hanging out. When they find you are not giving handouts, they move on.

A Brother’s Campfire Adventure seems lacking without a fire. I went ahead and build one for fun.

One method I like to use to start a fire in a pine forest is finding old pine needles and dead branches. All it normally takes is a bit of toilet paper or dry grass to catch needles like the ones pictured below ablaze.

I then add pine that looks like this and before you know it,

I had a good blaze going.

Most of our day was spent acclimating to the elevation. Our chests hurt a little, and walking felt a little like jogging.

Coffee came to mind.

We have been downsizing the equipment we are bringing to better harden us for the trail. Our large pot has been replaced with a french press for mobility. I would not be getting a cup until the next morning.

I determined that I would have a hot beverage nonetheless.

Not a Hot Beverage

I found a nearby stream and pulled out my trusty sawyer squeeze, found dandilion leaves and pine needles.

I simmered the foul concoction until the contents began making verbal proclamations to the fire, the cup containing it, and anything else that passed by.

Like this, but liquid

I was going to counsel the brew for it’s language and then it jumped down my throat. That was the end of that.

Before we knew it, It was dinner time. Due to our high elevation and prior experience from a another adventure, we brought a high altitude fuel so we could cook a combination of food groups in one pot. We affectionately called it glop . The glop was epic.

Epic Glop

The late aftenoon brought exploration for me. In my travels, I found a very dark flower. Perhaps someone can identify it for me.

The Camera Made It Much Brighter

I continued on my way and found a drone in the woods.

I handed my findings over to our tech specialist and he was able to pull the flight data. You can see the footage of it’s last flight here. Drone Crash

After watching the flight we resolved to find the owner.

No day is complete in the dark forest without making a few bigfoot vocalizations. Here is a combination of our efforts.

It was a cold one and our gear served us well. We were excited for sunrise and enjoyed coffee and oatmeal for breakfast.

On our way back,I stopped by the water to take a photo. The clear water reflected beautifully.

Here are a few more pictures of the area.

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So…. Back to the drone….

I researched the company I believed it belonged to and they put me on hold.

After 34 minutes a human answered and immediately put me through to a voice mail. I gave my full name and number and told them I may be in possession of something that belonged to them.

Whoo boy, did they call me back fast. It would have been nice to get that service the first go.

After telling them I found a drone, they asked a few too many questions for my taste. I assertively notified them if they could identify the make and model, the markings written, and the approximate date it was lost, I would make arrangements to return it. It is worth way too much to just hand over to a stranger. We will see how the process goes.

Author: The Storyteller

Benjamin Thiel is a husband, father, correctional professional and author of The Ongoing Tale at Brothers Campfire. His favorite quote is "Don't count the lions. It will make you afraid and slow you down."

47 thoughts on “A Brother’s Campfire Adventure- August 10th, 2020”

  1. Yes, this was an amazing post, nephew! Awesome family adventure including footage of an epic (yet safe) crash, a display of moral action and a family effort to capture Bigfoot calls. Loved it!

  2. Over 11,000′ Now that IS high!!! My nephews live in Salida, CO, which is about 7,000′. When they come ‘down’ to Calgary at 4,000′ they are like superheros with their large lung capacity. I have to run them like dogs to even begin to tire them out. I find acclimating the hardest part. While trekking in Peru, I found I lost my appetite anytime we went over 13,500′. I lived off 2 luna bars a day for 4 days once because I couldn’t poke anything else down my throat. Thanks for sharing your fun adventures!

    1. Hello, my fellow hiker and adventurer! Just wanted to let you know that you can register and sign in or stay anonymous if you desire!
      If I am not mistaken, high red blood cell counts make for altitude acclimation. Peru seems amazing as does Alberta, friend! As for altitude, 12,500 is where the eating becomes a little more difficult. I prefer the Colorado “cliff bar” over most. The Luna is great as well. Thanks for dropping by and be sure to subscribe!

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