Stay Down, Luke, There is Spanish to Learn.

I write my mind and my heart in varying percentages. You can determine which at your whim.

Writing about a Bard, Beast, and Brother helped me ease into online expression with a fair level of anonymity. Only a small handful of folks knows the meanings or representative storylines to my tales.

A story was trapped inside and an influential artist helped me find myself in it. It was my story, and while I may never achieve the heights of the great Sarah Angleton, I feel I didn’t do half bad.

Again, I feel somewhat trapped in writing, but let me tell you a little something; Some folks will get tired pushing me down and it will be my turn.

I spoke to a nurse who has seen a fair share of trouble in his life about a similar topic. He has no clue about my writing anxiety and it doesn’t really matter.

He speaks Spanish and has an excellent command of English.

When he heard about my wife having a stroke, he had a “sit-down son,” moment with me.

He looked just like this but 20 years older

He said, “lets talk about a metaphor,” and pulled out his phone with Google Translate.

He said I was bound up, in handcuffs, enduring. He showed me his phone for the Spanish translation.

Then he told me, “you are bound to your wife, I can tell. You are committed no matter what.”

“Let me show you a metaphor, the poetry of Spanish.”

He typed in his phone.

“They are that same. You are bound to your wife no matter what. Her troubles are your troubles.”

I thanked him for that. It was a unique way to encourage someone, and makes me want to get up and fight, again and again and again.

I am pretty sure he got the result he was looking for.

Author: The Storyteller

Benjamin Thiel is a husband, father, correctional professional and author of The Ongoing Tale at Brothers Campfire. His favorite quote is "Don't count the lions. It will make you afraid and slow you down."

20 thoughts on “Stay Down, Luke, There is Spanish to Learn.

  1. kagould17 says:

    A great story Benjamin. I think the Spanish got it right. They took the For Better or For Worse part seriously. So many these days do not. Hope your beloved is getting better day by day. Stay well. Allan

    Reply
  2. Jeff says:

    Mind-blowing. I’m learning Spanish, but had no clue that the words for spouse and handcuffs were almost the same. At first, it seems like the cruel joke of a cynic, but when explained the way your nurse did, it’s actually quite, well, almost romantic? Thank you for sharing this.

    Reply
  3. Sarah says:

    What a unique perspective! I initially bristle at the notion of comparing handcuffs and marriage commitments, but I think you and your nurse friend are right. There’s a comforting strength in imagining that physical connection that binds you together in the tough times. I’m sorry you and your wife are experiencing tough times.

    Also, I’m fairly certain that is the first time anyone has ever referred to me as an influential artist. I’m touched. Thank you.

    Reply

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