April Showers… I mean Snowfall

Hello Friends!

If you do not like the weather in the Colorado Rockies, wait 15 minutes! In fact, one part of town can be sunny and the other stormy!

I think “underlying” circumstances caused this!

It has been flurrying all morning and I figured today would be as good as any to give a brief overview about how I dress in cold weather.

This is not a post about surviving a snowstorm and most assuredly not a fashion statement.

Most heat is lost from the head, hands and feet. It is important to stay as dry as possible and dress in layers to avoid exposure and prevent overheating as well.

First of all, I want to let you know, I aquired everything pictured second hand or homemade.

Head Gear

When it is really cold, I pull out the Peruvian Alpaca head covering. It is warm and covers the ears. If it gets wet, I will still be able to stay relatively warm. A con to this piece of gear is that it does not protect the back of my neck very well. What can I say? It’s a hat.

A Buff, or Neck Gaitor made from Nylon,Lycra, and Spandex has multiple uses and drys quickly. I wear this around my neck and there is enough fabric to completely cover my head with it. It is also nicknamed, “the dirty girl” as you can carry one as a means to clean yourself in the woods. That is a blog post in itself.

Swimsuit Material For The Face!

When I was growing up, I despised sunglasses. I did not want to be thought of as too cool or look like I was hiding behind them. In snowy conditions, eye protection will reduce the chances of becoming snow blind.

This photo tells a story of it’s own.

When I am put together, I look ridiculously warm!

Or Just Ridiculous

Your Hands

When I was a youngster, I did my best to stay warm with dollar store knit gloves. I got smart quick and put newspaper sleeves and mittens on to stay toasty and dry. I use the same approach outside when sledding, hiking or snowball fighting.

From the dollar store, I purchase vinyl medical type gloves and put them under my work gloves. Provided you are a little cautious about things, Your hands will be dexterous long after your friends are nursing hot chocolate.

Your Feet

Keeping your feet warm and dry is important. If you plan on being outside for a while, wear wool socks. Your feet will eventually get wet, but wool will regulate your temperature and draw water away from your feet.

Darn Tough Socks have an Unconditional Lifetime Warranty!

Your shoes may vary. If you have wool socks on, your options increase. I prefer these water resistant Merrels. Mink oil is good to prolong their durability.

Layers

Cotton retains moisture and is a poor choice for staying warm. My first layer is a polyester T-Shirt.

I just leave my clothing on the floor like this.

Nylon is an excellent insulator and I prefer button down so I can roll my sleeves and vent the buttons as necessary. Especially after eating!

More Laundry on the Floor

I am on the fence about sweaters. I like when all of my layers can be compression into a small area for easy carry. This Peruvian Alpaca sweater fits the bill. It is lightweight and wicks moisture away quickly.

Jackets

In the interest of staying warm, I do not care if I match. Sometimes others believe I am making a fashion statement because I can pull it off.

Down jackets hold heat in very well, but they cannot get wet. If it is rainy or wet, ensure this layer is underneath a water resistant layer.

Have you heard of a hanger?

My outer layer is my polyester/elastane North Face Jacket. Water seems to avoid this garment.

Pants.

As stated earlier, this gear is meant for cold weather, but not a snowstorm. It will keep you warm if you are moderately active and a little wet, but not soaked.

I prefer 60 percent polyester cargo pants. They do not stick and freeze to you easily and they do not restrict movement. With nylon undergarments to include hosen, and wool socks, you can function a good while outside.

Dressing this way, I comfortably backpacked in the Maroon Bells area for nearly a week in below freezing temperatures.

What’s that? …. Oh.. You want to see it all together.

Who is this socially distant masked man?

Well, that is how I dress to stay warm in this Chinook Wind April weather.What are some ways you stay warm outside?

Author: The Storyteller

Don't count the lions. It will make you afraid and slow you down.

80 thoughts on “April Showers… I mean Snowfall”

          1. It is a term that some hikers use for them. You can tie soap inside and get a lather. They clean easy and are not hard on sensitive areas like the nose.

  1. I really enjoyed reading this. It reminds me of my 1st Christmas in NY! I got to experience similar to what you described. But here In California its always cold or chilly but we dont really need layers of clothing. We do wear head covering when its really cold and we always hv our jackets. Stay warm my frriend and be safe. Blessings

  2. I’m in SoCal… pretty much the most I wear is nylons or leggings under loose pants, an extra shirt under a jacket, and an extra pair of socks. If that’s not enough, I don’t go outside!!

    1. Oh… and maaaaybe a scarf or something to cover my ears. But that’s rare (I did it a year ago but it was special circumstances that caused me to go outside in temps below 55).

          1. After summer we have monsoon. (Rainy season) heavy rains throughout nation till september.
            From November winter starts and goes till february last week.

          2. I am far from sea.
            Also, I am veg.
            Also, I don’t think Indians fish as a hobby. But I can’t speak for 1.3 Billion people.
            It is quite uncommon compared to in the US.

  3. In the last week, we got another foot of snow with -30 temperatures and high winds. I’m more than ready for our 4 months of summer weather!!!

  4. Really enjoyed reading. Where I live, it’s doesn’t snow so I get to miss all those fun stuff you do in winter❄️❄️❄️ Sounds like you are having fun😀 we still have a month n half before actual winter starts here😊

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