James Viscosi, Viscosity

Hello, Benjamin from Brother’s Campfire here!

I have been doing my best to give a shout put to the many folks that have helped us this far in the journey after my Beloved had a stroke.

Not Possible! Just know I am thankful for each and every one of you!

James Viscosi, Author at

https://jamesviscosi.com/about/ writes in numerous genres to include horror, science fiction, mysteries, and crime. Sometimes he mixes it up into the “Unclassifiable”

One classy thing is his engaging writing style. I was laughing and relating during the first few paragraphs and just couldn’t stop reading. If you, or someone you know have experienced a stroke, it is a worthy read.

If you have not, take a baby aspirin, be thankful, and read the man’s work.

Thanks James, You are amazing!

Author: The Storyteller

Benjamin Thiel is a husband, father, correctional professional and author of The Ongoing Tale at Brothers Campfire. His favorite quote is "Don't count the lions. It will make you afraid and slow you down."

Author: The Storyteller

Benjamin Thiel is a husband, father, correctional professional and author of The Ongoing Tale at Brothers Campfire. His favorite quote is "Don't count the lions. It will make you afraid and slow you down."

16 thoughts on “James Viscosi, Viscosity

  1. nonsmokingladybug says:

    I take a baby aspirin every day. My husband was spared a heart attack when they found his blocked arteries during pre-op for a small procedure. He had quadruple bypass, the doctor said him taking a baby aspirin and cholesterol medication for many years, might have saved him. Thank you for the reading recommendation.

    Reply
  2. Cindy Georgakas says:

    my step father was carted away by the ambulance the other night and said. ” good we have his meds.. no aspirin for this lad! 🙏🌈❤️

    Reply
  3. James Viscosi says:

    Thanks for the shout-out! I published that series hoping it might help someone someday who’s in a similar situation. At the very least, maybe someone will read it and remember not to bother getting dressed if they need to call 911 while they’re in their pajamas … 🙂

    Reply
      1. James Viscosi says:

        It took a while after mine before I could comfortably read on screens for more than a few minutes at a time, so I completely understand that!

        Reply
          1. James Viscosi says:

            For me it was probably around six weeks of gradually increasing screen time, but there are people in the aneurysm group I belong to on Facebook for whom it takes months or even years ― I guess it depends where the damage was done and how much there was. Oh, also, I went back to the eye doctor (even though I had just been there maybe a month before the rupture) and she found that my vision had changed a little as a result, and I eventually ended up getting new glasses.

          2. The Storyteller says:

            She has an appointment for a specialized optometrist next month.
            Her vision is much much better than last month. Thanks for the info. She had a blood clot type stroke.

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