James Viscosi, Viscosity

Hello, Benjamin from Brother’s Campfire here!

I have been doing my best to give a shout put to the many folks that have helped us this far in the journey after my Beloved had a stroke.

Not Possible! Just know I am thankful for each and every one of you!

James Viscosi, Author at

https://jamesviscosi.com/about/ writes in numerous genres to include horror, science fiction, mysteries, and crime. Sometimes he mixes it up into the “Unclassifiable”

One classy thing is his engaging writing style. I was laughing and relating during the first few paragraphs and just couldn’t stop reading. If you, or someone you know have experienced a stroke, it is a worthy read.

If you have not, take a baby aspirin, be thankful, and read the man’s work.

Thanks James, You are amazing!

Author: The Storyteller

Benjamin Thiel is a husband, father, correctional professional and author of The Ongoing Tale at Brothers Campfire.

16 thoughts on “James Viscosi, Viscosity

  1. nonsmokingladybug says:

    I take a baby aspirin every day. My husband was spared a heart attack when they found his blocked arteries during pre-op for a small procedure. He had quadruple bypass, the doctor said him taking a baby aspirin and cholesterol medication for many years, might have saved him. Thank you for the reading recommendation.

    Reply
    1. The Storyteller says:

      I am no doctor, but I listen to them for my family. I am glad that may have saved him. 🤠🔥

      Reply
  2. Cindy Georgakas says:

    my step father was carted away by the ambulance the other night and said. ” good we have his meds.. no aspirin for this lad! 🙏🌈❤️

    Reply
  3. James Viscosi says:

    Thanks for the shout-out! I published that series hoping it might help someone someday who’s in a similar situation. At the very least, maybe someone will read it and remember not to bother getting dressed if they need to call 911 while they’re in their pajamas … 🙂

    Reply
      1. James Viscosi says:

        It took a while after mine before I could comfortably read on screens for more than a few minutes at a time, so I completely understand that!

        Reply
          1. James Viscosi says:

            For me it was probably around six weeks of gradually increasing screen time, but there are people in the aneurysm group I belong to on Facebook for whom it takes months or even years ― I guess it depends where the damage was done and how much there was. Oh, also, I went back to the eye doctor (even though I had just been there maybe a month before the rupture) and she found that my vision had changed a little as a result, and I eventually ended up getting new glasses.

          2. The Storyteller says:

            She has an appointment for a specialized optometrist next month.
            Her vision is much much better than last month. Thanks for the info. She had a blood clot type stroke.

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