Brothers Campfire Speaks of Grandmother’s Bread

This winter has brought memories of my grandmother making bread and cinnamon rolls from scratch.

As a child, it seemed like she dumped a bag of flour on the table and it seemingly grew into those beautiful loaves of bread.

Those carb filled morsels were a blessing on those days when there weren’t as many commodities to go around or leftovers in the fridge.

After asking my sister for her recipe, a 12 year veteran of life and I set out to make her famous bread. We were successful, but unable to mix as much flour in the dough as the recipe called for. It could have been many things, but I suspect only grandmother could make bread the way she did. I am told She used theBetty Crocker Traditional White Bread recipe as a guidline, but I believe she kneaded some love in there as well. Personally, never saw her with a recipe card…..Ever.

For you bakers out there, perhaps you can tell me why I can only get 5 cups of flour in the dough.

Ingredients

6cups all-purpose flour. 1tablespoon salt. 2tablespoons shortening. 2packages quick active dry yeast. 2 1/4cups very warm water

I loved my Grandmother very much and I confided in her. I would tell her my problems and she would listen attentively. This was especially important in my teenage years when I felt so alone.

Reminiscing this wonderful grandmother of mine, I slathered an inordinate amount of salted butter and plum jelly on my helping and washed it down with Bengal Spice Tea, just they way she would have liked it.

I love you grandmother. There is no oxygen tanks or walkers up there. I will see you after while.

Author: The Storyteller

Benjamin Thiel is a husband, father, correctional professional and author of The Ongoing Tale at Brothers Campfire.

53 thoughts on “Brothers Campfire Speaks of Grandmother’s Bread

  1. moragnoffke says:

    I enjoyed reading your post… And I am not a regular bread baker, but do bake bread, cakes and rusks (South African sweet bread/dough which is baked and the cut into fingers and baked again or dried out slowly for half a day or so.) and (I am actually baking them as I write this) I am told that it depends on the weather or the humidity in the air…it affects the moisture content of your flour. If the atmosphere is very dry you would need more moisture… I am not sure if that even helps or not. I am open to correction 🤔🤔🤔just a guess

    Reply
    1. The Storyteller says:

      I think you are right. I wet my hands in the sink to make it absorb more. It is quite dry here! Thank you for the advice!

      Reply
    1. The Storyteller says:

      Thank you! It is my favorite coffee cup! I like to reflect the chandelier whenever I do a dinner table shot!

      Reply
    1. Beverly says:

      We miss you Grandma, but you are resting in His arms….see you soon! Well done, nephew. She loved you dearly. She would want you to pass on her recipes, etc. You captured the most important ingredient, that is, the love she poured into the making of bread for her loved ones.

      Reply
  2. Cassa Bassa says:

    I only know the magic of bread dough is in the temperature of the hands. Great tribute and memory of your grandmother. 💜

    Reply
  3. ellie894 says:

    A lovely share!
    I do like to bake and have some experience with dough although I’m far from expert.
    Often in yeast bread recipes the amount of flour is a guideline with a little room either way. That’s why a recipe will say something like “add flour a cup at a time until the dough comes together and is easy to handle”. Your grandmother would have known the feeling of the dough after so many loving years. The knowing was literally in her hands.
    Bread recipes often tell you a bit of extra flour just so you’ll have some on standby in case the dough is sticky while you’re kneading it.
    I hope that you and your young helper will keep making bread.. you will learn the feel of it in time, just like your grandmother did.
    Have a wonderful day!! 😊

    Reply
  4. Petra says:

    Grandmothers are epic. I always feel closest to mine when baking Christmas cookies or cooking her recipes. I never use recipes when I cook, but I do use hers. Also, your flour problem may be due to lack of water. Different flours absorb different quantities of water on different days depending on ambient moisture etc. It’s always good to adjust recipe quantities

    Reply
  5. Paquerite says:

    My grandmother prepared pasta like no one else, she left with the recipe for her pasta gruyère …
    I loved her so much, it’s strong how our grandmothers manage to feed our imagination, our love and maintain our feelings for them despite the absence,
    I found his recipe book, and by doing everything to the letter I found the taste of his rice pudding
    Immense happiness
    You are lucky to have known your grandmother’s love, it’s a grace, a priceless gift
    Good night

    Reply
  6. Rebornblossom says:

    First of all you made me got very emotional with your words about your grandmother. I had a very strong relation with mine too therefore I know the feeling. They gave me her same name and she touched many things. Approaching Christmas time I miss her more❤️ Secondly I believe that beloved people always stay with us through memories , gestures and soul.

    Reply
    1. The Storyteller says:

      Reborn Blossom, those memories are bittersweet at times aren’t they?

      Missing them and loving them.

      I was very fond of my Grandmother.

      Reply
      1. Rebornblossom says:

        They are sometimes bittersweet but I am sure she would like to remember her all the best one since she is next to you with her love😍🌺

        Reply
          1. Rebornblossom says:

            Here after days of heavly rain it is sunny but very cold like if it were the snow😂

          2. Rebornblossom says:

            Once the weather was divided in 4 seasons but now there are all mixed and very unpredictable😂

          3. The Storyteller says:

            In Colorado, they say if you do not like the weather, wait 15 minutes! 🤠🔥😅😅

  7. Iñaki de Villa says:

    … Qué pinta buena que tiene. Me gusta. Salud y saludos

    Reply

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